75 Replies to “So you want to be an editor? Want an editor to pick you out of the slush pile?”

  1. *thumbs up*

    Mostly things I knew, but maybe that’s because I have been blessed to be a part of Momwriters and have friends like Joshilyn Jackson. Writers need to hear it like it is.

    Revising has been the hardest thing for me. I have written a few manuscripts, finally have one I find worthy of more attention and am on my third revision. I had to put the whole thing away for about 4 months before starting this revision and while some other people read it and critiqued. Now, I am 2 chapters into this revision and still changing so much.

    Anyhow, I think the list for writers is a good one. It could be extremely helpful.

  2. *thumbs up*

    Mostly things I knew, but maybe that’s because I have been blessed to be a part of Momwriters and have friends like Joshilyn Jackson. Writers need to hear it like it is.

    Revising has been the hardest thing for me. I have written a few manuscripts, finally have one I find worthy of more attention and am on my third revision. I had to put the whole thing away for about 4 months before starting this revision and while some other people read it and critiqued. Now, I am 2 chapters into this revision and still changing so much.

    Anyhow, I think the list for writers is a good one. It could be extremely helpful.

  3. *thumbs up*

    Mostly things I knew, but maybe that’s because I have been blessed to be a part of Momwriters and have friends like Joshilyn Jackson. Writers need to hear it like it is.

    Revising has been the hardest thing for me. I have written a few manuscripts, finally have one I find worthy of more attention and am on my third revision. I had to put the whole thing away for about 4 months before starting this revision and while some other people read it and critiqued. Now, I am 2 chapters into this revision and still changing so much.

    Anyhow, I think the list for writers is a good one. It could be extremely helpful.

  4. And don’t waste your time telling an editor how wonderful s/he is, and/or how much you admire what s/he has done. This is a submission. You want something. We’re not going to believe you.

    That made me laugh because it’s so true. This was interesting. Thanks.

  5. And don’t waste your time telling an editor how wonderful s/he is, and/or how much you admire what s/he has done. This is a submission. You want something. We’re not going to believe you.

    That made me laugh because it’s so true. This was interesting. Thanks.

  6. And don’t waste your time telling an editor how wonderful s/he is, and/or how much you admire what s/he has done. This is a submission. You want something. We’re not going to believe you.

    That made me laugh because it’s so true. This was interesting. Thanks.

  7. Good stuff. I like hearing editors lay it on the line, it saves so much time. Different editors do things slightly different sometimes, so I really think it’s a good idea to go to conferences and hear them speak. I disagree with ‘don’t compliment an editor…’. Although I know it comes across as insincere, when I’ve heard them speak at a conference, more often than not I am so impressed with their passion about books. I mention this in my cover letter, letting them know that I WAS listening to them speak, but I do mean it. I like to give positives, whenever I talk to anyone. When I put it in a cover letter, I don’t write anything I don’t feel and I keep it very brief. I don’t see anything wrong with that.

    I’ve been reading Sharyn’s LJ for awhile now. She cracks me up with her humor and straight forwardness. She’s a little mean now and then ;), but what are you going to do? I can see why you love her so much as your editor. I should be so lucky, someday, to have an editor like her. I can write that because this isn’t a cover letter and I don’t currently have a manuscript that would be right for her anyway…maybe later, but not now. If that still comes across as insincere, well that’s not my problem :p.

    Off to read about if I want to be an editor.
    Angela Fox

  8. Good stuff. I like hearing editors lay it on the line, it saves so much time. Different editors do things slightly different sometimes, so I really think it’s a good idea to go to conferences and hear them speak. I disagree with ‘don’t compliment an editor…’. Although I know it comes across as insincere, when I’ve heard them speak at a conference, more often than not I am so impressed with their passion about books. I mention this in my cover letter, letting them know that I WAS listening to them speak, but I do mean it. I like to give positives, whenever I talk to anyone. When I put it in a cover letter, I don’t write anything I don’t feel and I keep it very brief. I don’t see anything wrong with that.

    I’ve been reading Sharyn’s LJ for awhile now. She cracks me up with her humor and straight forwardness. She’s a little mean now and then ;), but what are you going to do? I can see why you love her so much as your editor. I should be so lucky, someday, to have an editor like her. I can write that because this isn’t a cover letter and I don’t currently have a manuscript that would be right for her anyway…maybe later, but not now. If that still comes across as insincere, well that’s not my problem :p.

    Off to read about if I want to be an editor.
    Angela Fox

      1. No worries. Sometimes I think, “somebody picked that shirt out and liked it.” But, if you check your comments, I have contributed to your ‘ugly clothes’ threads(oh lord…there is a pun there). So, as the ‘cliche goes, “when you point a finger, you have three pointing back at you.” Mostly I said you were mean so I didn’t sound like a total suck up. Did it work? Should I start adding that to my cover letters? “I really enjoyed your speech at the blah blah conference, but you had spinach in your teeth.”

        They’re going to start putting my name on the “special” lists for the conferences…aren’t they?
        Angela Fox

  9. Good stuff. I like hearing editors lay it on the line, it saves so much time. Different editors do things slightly different sometimes, so I really think it’s a good idea to go to conferences and hear them speak. I disagree with ‘don’t compliment an editor…’. Although I know it comes across as insincere, when I’ve heard them speak at a conference, more often than not I am so impressed with their passion about books. I mention this in my cover letter, letting them know that I WAS listening to them speak, but I do mean it. I like to give positives, whenever I talk to anyone. When I put it in a cover letter, I don’t write anything I don’t feel and I keep it very brief. I don’t see anything wrong with that.

    I’ve been reading Sharyn’s LJ for awhile now. She cracks me up with her humor and straight forwardness. She’s a little mean now and then ;), but what are you going to do? I can see why you love her so much as your editor. I should be so lucky, someday, to have an editor like her. I can write that because this isn’t a cover letter and I don’t currently have a manuscript that would be right for her anyway…maybe later, but not now. If that still comes across as insincere, well that’s not my problem :p.

    Off to read about if I want to be an editor.
    Angela Fox

  10. quick question. If you can answer it would be much much appreciated. When, if ever, is it OK to use humor in a “formal paper”?

    formal meaning a highschool critique/paper where it’s alright to use “I believe…”

    I’m writting a paper about the Crucible, which is kinda dull to say the least. Thought humor could help me out, but I don’t want to sound dumb.
    heh.

  11. quick question. If you can answer it would be much much appreciated. When, if ever, is it OK to use humor in a “formal paper”?

    formal meaning a highschool critique/paper where it’s alright to use “I believe…”

    I’m writting a paper about the Crucible, which is kinda dull to say the least. Thought humor could help me out, but I don’t want to sound dumb.
    heh.

      1. My personal thoughts on the subject as 1. a college student who had to write about the Crucible 4 years ago in high school and 2. a writing center tutor (which means I took a course in tutoring and my work/study job is helping people improve their writing) and 3. someone related to Laurie but who DID get good grades in high school English:

        I can understand your desire, but I’d advise against it. There are two caveats: you know your teacher fairly well, and you think you have similar senses of humor, or, you don’t care what grade you get on the paper (an attitude which I admire you for, and which I wish I had cultivated in high school). If either of those are true, then go for it.

        When it comes to formal academic writing, humor is usually straight out. That usually disappears has you get into higher levels of writing, for an academic journal for example, but as I think loftscribbler has said on this blog before, you have to prove you can write by the rules first before you can break them. It might be a better idea–in the sense that it will enrich your academic life and amuse you simultaneously–if you instead pick something about The Crucible that is weird or cool to you, and enjoy the paper that way. You’ll solidify good writing habits AND push yourself intellectually AND maybe, just maybe, find a way to enjoy the book. Good luck!

        ps: Thank your lucky stars your paper isn’t on The Scarlet Letter!

        1. Thanks for that answer!
          So is it OK if it’s a journal-type thing?
          The last paper I wrote my teacher commented well written and I was witty and bright so I thought I could pull it off.( and i knew she liked my humor) but my thoughts for the Cruicble would be I would either nail it or totally miss with the humor. As for the Scarlet Letter, so happy I’m not reading it.
          Happy Birthday Laurie author woman!!

  12. quick question. If you can answer it would be much much appreciated. When, if ever, is it OK to use humor in a “formal paper”?

    formal meaning a highschool critique/paper where it’s alright to use “I believe…”

    I’m writting a paper about the Crucible, which is kinda dull to say the least. Thought humor could help me out, but I don’t want to sound dumb.
    heh.

  13. why is it that people seem so against teenagers becoming authors? don’t they believe any teenager can handle it? i mean who better to write about teenagers? and even after their not they can reflect on it

  14. why is it that people seem so against teenagers becoming authors? don’t they believe any teenager can handle it? i mean who better to write about teenagers? and even after their not they can reflect on it

    1. I’m dead-set against teenagers becoming authors. I think that from 15-25 a person undergoes so much change personally and in writing style that it’s better to wait until the person is settled.

      I’m 20, and if I had gotten published at 15 or 17 or even just 8 months ago, I would cringe to anything I wrote then in the public press, because as my life has changed, my writing has changed, A LOT, and gotten better. I understand the desire to publish young–it’s chic, it’s validating, and so on. I think it’s wiser to hold onto what I think now is good enough for publication and look at it again later in my life, and re-evaluate it.

      Teenagers, by the by, are good about writing about two things: themselves, and complete fantasy worlds. Both of these things are mired in cliche and bleghdom, after a while. I can completely sympathize with Sharyn’s no teenagers rule. If a teenager is a good writer, they will probably be a much better writer in five years, so might as well wait.

  15. why is it that people seem so against teenagers becoming authors? don’t they believe any teenager can handle it? i mean who better to write about teenagers? and even after their not they can reflect on it

  16. The realistic advice for writers was certainly not surprising, and I really do appreciate hearing the inside scoop. But it never gets easier to hear the depressing truth – that you need to have a personal connection to an editor or be represented by an agent before you can submit a manuscript for consideration. I’ve heard that getting an agent can be even harder than finding a publisher. So here I am, close to finishing a YA I’ve been working on for over two years, knowing that the hardest work is still ahead – trying to find a way to get an editor to take a look at the ms! Sigh…
    By the way, Laurie, I know you said you don’t read much YA, but I just finished Upstream by Melissa Lion and I think you might really like it. It’s wonderfully written.
    — MB

  17. The realistic advice for writers was certainly not surprising, and I really do appreciate hearing the inside scoop. But it never gets easier to hear the depressing truth – that you need to have a personal connection to an editor or be represented by an agent before you can submit a manuscript for consideration. I’ve heard that getting an agent can be even harder than finding a publisher. So here I am, close to finishing a YA I’ve been working on for over two years, knowing that the hardest work is still ahead – trying to find a way to get an editor to take a look at the ms! Sigh…
    By the way, Laurie, I know you said you don’t read much YA, but I just finished Upstream by Melissa Lion and I think you might really like it. It’s wonderfully written.
    — MB

    1. There is hope!

      I sold 4 picture books, a series, and two novels (SPEAK and FEVER 1793) before I had an agent. The only “connection” I had was that I had met the editor from Simon & Schuster who published two of those books (FEVER and BIG CHEESE on THIRD STREET) at an SCBWI conference. But before he accepted those books, he turned down a bunch of other stuff I sent him. The books were picked out of the slush pile.

      Do not be discouraged.

      1. Laurie, this is so good to read. It’s easy for me to get discouraged as the rejections pile up. I know that perserverence is the key and I love it when I get that bug to keep going no matter what.

        Thanks for the encouragement. I will not give up. 🙂

  18. The realistic advice for writers was certainly not surprising, and I really do appreciate hearing the inside scoop. But it never gets easier to hear the depressing truth – that you need to have a personal connection to an editor or be represented by an agent before you can submit a manuscript for consideration. I’ve heard that getting an agent can be even harder than finding a publisher. So here I am, close to finishing a YA I’ve been working on for over two years, knowing that the hardest work is still ahead – trying to find a way to get an editor to take a look at the ms! Sigh…
    By the way, Laurie, I know you said you don’t read much YA, but I just finished Upstream by Melissa Lion and I think you might really like it. It’s wonderfully written.
    — MB

  19. There is hope!

    I sold 4 picture books, a series, and two novels (SPEAK and FEVER 1793) before I had an agent. The only “connection” I had was that I had met the editor from Simon & Schuster who published two of those books (FEVER and BIG CHEESE on THIRD STREET) at an SCBWI conference. But before he accepted those books, he turned down a bunch of other stuff I sent him. The books were picked out of the slush pile.

    Do not be discouraged.

  20. There is hope!

    I sold 4 picture books, a series, and two novels (SPEAK and FEVER 1793) before I had an agent. The only “connection” I had was that I had met the editor from Simon & Schuster who published two of those books (FEVER and BIG CHEESE on THIRD STREET) at an SCBWI conference. But before he accepted those books, he turned down a bunch of other stuff I sent him. The books were picked out of the slush pile.

    Do not be discouraged.

  21. My personal thoughts on the subject as 1. a college student who had to write about the Crucible 4 years ago in high school and 2. a writing center tutor (which means I took a course in tutoring and my work/study job is helping people improve their writing) and 3. someone related to Laurie but who DID get good grades in high school English:

    I can understand your desire, but I’d advise against it. There are two caveats: you know your teacher fairly well, and you think you have similar senses of humor, or, you don’t care what grade you get on the paper (an attitude which I admire you for, and which I wish I had cultivated in high school). If either of those are true, then go for it.

    When it comes to formal academic writing, humor is usually straight out. That usually disappears has you get into higher levels of writing, for an academic journal for example, but as I think loftscribbler has said on this blog before, you have to prove you can write by the rules first before you can break them. It might be a better idea–in the sense that it will enrich your academic life and amuse you simultaneously–if you instead pick something about The Crucible that is weird or cool to you, and enjoy the paper that way. You’ll solidify good writing habits AND push yourself intellectually AND maybe, just maybe, find a way to enjoy the book. Good luck!

    ps: Thank your lucky stars your paper isn’t on The Scarlet Letter!

  22. My personal thoughts on the subject as 1. a college student who had to write about the Crucible 4 years ago in high school and 2. a writing center tutor (which means I took a course in tutoring and my work/study job is helping people improve their writing) and 3. someone related to Laurie but who DID get good grades in high school English:

    I can understand your desire, but I’d advise against it. There are two caveats: you know your teacher fairly well, and you think you have similar senses of humor, or, you don’t care what grade you get on the paper (an attitude which I admire you for, and which I wish I had cultivated in high school). If either of those are true, then go for it.

    When it comes to formal academic writing, humor is usually straight out. That usually disappears has you get into higher levels of writing, for an academic journal for example, but as I think loftscribbler has said on this blog before, you have to prove you can write by the rules first before you can break them. It might be a better idea–in the sense that it will enrich your academic life and amuse you simultaneously–if you instead pick something about The Crucible that is weird or cool to you, and enjoy the paper that way. You’ll solidify good writing habits AND push yourself intellectually AND maybe, just maybe, find a way to enjoy the book. Good luck!

    ps: Thank your lucky stars your paper isn’t on The Scarlet Letter!

  23. I’m dead-set against teenagers becoming authors. I think that from 15-25 a person undergoes so much change personally and in writing style that it’s better to wait until the person is settled.

    I’m 20, and if I had gotten published at 15 or 17 or even just 8 months ago, I would cringe to anything I wrote then in the public press, because as my life has changed, my writing has changed, A LOT, and gotten better. I understand the desire to publish young–it’s chic, it’s validating, and so on. I think it’s wiser to hold onto what I think now is good enough for publication and look at it again later in my life, and re-evaluate it.

    Teenagers, by the by, are good about writing about two things: themselves, and complete fantasy worlds. Both of these things are mired in cliche and bleghdom, after a while. I can completely sympathize with Sharyn’s no teenagers rule. If a teenager is a good writer, they will probably be a much better writer in five years, so might as well wait.

  24. I’m dead-set against teenagers becoming authors. I think that from 15-25 a person undergoes so much change personally and in writing style that it’s better to wait until the person is settled.

    I’m 20, and if I had gotten published at 15 or 17 or even just 8 months ago, I would cringe to anything I wrote then in the public press, because as my life has changed, my writing has changed, A LOT, and gotten better. I understand the desire to publish young–it’s chic, it’s validating, and so on. I think it’s wiser to hold onto what I think now is good enough for publication and look at it again later in my life, and re-evaluate it.

    Teenagers, by the by, are good about writing about two things: themselves, and complete fantasy worlds. Both of these things are mired in cliche and bleghdom, after a while. I can completely sympathize with Sharyn’s no teenagers rule. If a teenager is a good writer, they will probably be a much better writer in five years, so might as well wait.

  25. Laurie, this is so good to read. It’s easy for me to get discouraged as the rejections pile up. I know that perserverence is the key and I love it when I get that bug to keep going no matter what.

    Thanks for the encouragement. I will not give up. 🙂

  26. Laurie, this is so good to read. It’s easy for me to get discouraged as the rejections pile up. I know that perserverence is the key and I love it when I get that bug to keep going no matter what.

    Thanks for the encouragement. I will not give up. 🙂

  27. I dont know if you remeber me???

    Hi Im Angel
    last year you came to my school (renassance school for the arts in appleton wisconsin) I know you meet a ton of people you took a few pictures of me and I told you I was from massena new york and you said you were from syracuse. I acidentally lost your email but tonight my best friend and I watched speak (kudos exellent movie) who knows you write another book as great a SPEAK I might star in the movie(smiles and dreams if only (: ……) anyway you movie was amazing my best friend and I were in tears and I was excited when I got to tell her I met the author and she inspired me to get MY thoughts down on paper now I write plays and peform them with my friends. Anyway I dont think you’d remember me its been so long but I hope you would e-mail me at ANGELSUFE@wmconnect.com

  28. I dont know if you remeber me???

    Hi Im Angel
    last year you came to my school (renassance school for the arts in appleton wisconsin) I know you meet a ton of people you took a few pictures of me and I told you I was from massena new york and you said you were from syracuse. I acidentally lost your email but tonight my best friend and I watched speak (kudos exellent movie) who knows you write another book as great a SPEAK I might star in the movie(smiles and dreams if only (: ……) anyway you movie was amazing my best friend and I were in tears and I was excited when I got to tell her I met the author and she inspired me to get MY thoughts down on paper now I write plays and peform them with my friends. Anyway I dont think you’d remember me its been so long but I hope you would e-mail me at ANGELSUFE@wmconnect.com

    1. Re: I dont know if you remeber me???

      Hi sweetie! I’ve had to cut back on email – that’s part of what keeping this blog is all about. I’m glad you guys liked the movie.

  29. I dont know if you remeber me???

    Hi Im Angel
    last year you came to my school (renassance school for the arts in appleton wisconsin) I know you meet a ton of people you took a few pictures of me and I told you I was from massena new york and you said you were from syracuse. I acidentally lost your email but tonight my best friend and I watched speak (kudos exellent movie) who knows you write another book as great a SPEAK I might star in the movie(smiles and dreams if only (: ……) anyway you movie was amazing my best friend and I were in tears and I was excited when I got to tell her I met the author and she inspired me to get MY thoughts down on paper now I write plays and peform them with my friends. Anyway I dont think you’d remember me its been so long but I hope you would e-mail me at ANGELSUFE@wmconnect.com

  30. No worries. Sometimes I think, “somebody picked that shirt out and liked it.” But, if you check your comments, I have contributed to your ‘ugly clothes’ threads(oh lord…there is a pun there). So, as the ‘cliche goes, “when you point a finger, you have three pointing back at you.” Mostly I said you were mean so I didn’t sound like a total suck up. Did it work? Should I start adding that to my cover letters? “I really enjoyed your speech at the blah blah conference, but you had spinach in your teeth.”

    They’re going to start putting my name on the “special” lists for the conferences…aren’t they?
    Angela Fox

  31. No worries. Sometimes I think, “somebody picked that shirt out and liked it.” But, if you check your comments, I have contributed to your ‘ugly clothes’ threads(oh lord…there is a pun there). So, as the ‘cliche goes, “when you point a finger, you have three pointing back at you.” Mostly I said you were mean so I didn’t sound like a total suck up. Did it work? Should I start adding that to my cover letters? “I really enjoyed your speech at the blah blah conference, but you had spinach in your teeth.”

    They’re going to start putting my name on the “special” lists for the conferences…aren’t they?
    Angela Fox

  32. Thanks for that answer!
    So is it OK if it’s a journal-type thing?
    The last paper I wrote my teacher commented well written and I was witty and bright so I thought I could pull it off.( and i knew she liked my humor) but my thoughts for the Cruicble would be I would either nail it or totally miss with the humor. As for the Scarlet Letter, so happy I’m not reading it.
    Happy Birthday Laurie author woman!!

  33. Thanks for that answer!
    So is it OK if it’s a journal-type thing?
    The last paper I wrote my teacher commented well written and I was witty and bright so I thought I could pull it off.( and i knew she liked my humor) but my thoughts for the Cruicble would be I would either nail it or totally miss with the humor. As for the Scarlet Letter, so happy I’m not reading it.
    Happy Birthday Laurie author woman!!

  34. Wasn’t sure where to put this, so it’s going to go here. 😛

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEAR LAURIE
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!

    (sung in the very famous Quirk style 😉 )

  35. Wasn’t sure where to put this, so it’s going to go here. 😛

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEAR LAURIE
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!

    (sung in the very famous Quirk style 😉 )

  36. Wasn’t sure where to put this, so it’s going to go here. 😛

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY DEAR LAURIE
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!

    (sung in the very famous Quirk style 😉 )

  37. So Laurie, I will use this opportunity to tell you that I met you before at LA down in the jacuzzi, swimming pool place, where Sonya was down there and all the writers were down there, and the conversation was so great, I wish I would have taped it so I could have played it on all the nights when I feel like a lonely writer. But I didn’t have it so I couldn’t play it so I came here to livejournal here instead and here YOU are, and I went to your website to try to write you, but wasn’t sure what link you would get so I assume that you will get this . . .
    but ANYWAY I was the one who kept getting out of the jacuzzi and doing handstands in the pool, because I am sorry, that is too cool blue to go unhandstanded. . .
    but I hurried right back in that giant jacuzzi to listen to all the important writers talking about their dreams, and I ventured a few myself, and you turned around, shot me a smile, and said, you’ll do it.
    Well, Laurie, I did it!
    . . .and if you want to see me, and how my book dreams turned out, you can check out http://www.thereadingmom.com, and anyhow, I am glad that so many more of YOUR dreams have come true, and I am glad I found you on livejournal to friend. :)) I love your blog.
    . . .and I am feeling brave tonight so I will hit “post comment” in exactly two seconds
    Writing blessings
    and writing handstands too,
    Margaret 🙂

  38. So Laurie, I will use this opportunity to tell you that I met you before at LA down in the jacuzzi, swimming pool place, where Sonya was down there and all the writers were down there, and the conversation was so great, I wish I would have taped it so I could have played it on all the nights when I feel like a lonely writer. But I didn’t have it so I couldn’t play it so I came here to livejournal here instead and here YOU are, and I went to your website to try to write you, but wasn’t sure what link you would get so I assume that you will get this . . .
    but ANYWAY I was the one who kept getting out of the jacuzzi and doing handstands in the pool, because I am sorry, that is too cool blue to go unhandstanded. . .
    but I hurried right back in that giant jacuzzi to listen to all the important writers talking about their dreams, and I ventured a few myself, and you turned around, shot me a smile, and said, you’ll do it.
    Well, Laurie, I did it!
    . . .and if you want to see me, and how my book dreams turned out, you can check out http://www.thereadingmom.com, and anyhow, I am glad that so many more of YOUR dreams have come true, and I am glad I found you on livejournal to friend. :)) I love your blog.
    . . .and I am feeling brave tonight so I will hit “post comment” in exactly two seconds
    Writing blessings
    and writing handstands too,
    Margaret 🙂

  39. So Laurie, I will use this opportunity to tell you that I met you before at LA down in the jacuzzi, swimming pool place, where Sonya was down there and all the writers were down there, and the conversation was so great, I wish I would have taped it so I could have played it on all the nights when I feel like a lonely writer. But I didn’t have it so I couldn’t play it so I came here to livejournal here instead and here YOU are, and I went to your website to try to write you, but wasn’t sure what link you would get so I assume that you will get this . . .
    but ANYWAY I was the one who kept getting out of the jacuzzi and doing handstands in the pool, because I am sorry, that is too cool blue to go unhandstanded. . .
    but I hurried right back in that giant jacuzzi to listen to all the important writers talking about their dreams, and I ventured a few myself, and you turned around, shot me a smile, and said, you’ll do it.
    Well, Laurie, I did it!
    . . .and if you want to see me, and how my book dreams turned out, you can check out http://www.thereadingmom.com, and anyhow, I am glad that so many more of YOUR dreams have come true, and I am glad I found you on livejournal to friend. :)) I love your blog.
    . . .and I am feeling brave tonight so I will hit “post comment” in exactly two seconds
    Writing blessings
    and writing handstands too,
    Margaret 🙂

  40. Re: I dont know if you remeber me???

    Hi sweetie! I’ve had to cut back on email – that’s part of what keeping this blog is all about. I’m glad you guys liked the movie.

  41. Re: I dont know if you remeber me???

    Hi sweetie! I’ve had to cut back on email – that’s part of what keeping this blog is all about. I’m glad you guys liked the movie.

Comments are closed.