ALA awards announced!!

Many, many congratulations to all the winners!!!!!

The Printz
LOOKING FOR ALASKA by John Green

Honor Books
BLACK JUICE by Margo Lanagan
I AM THE MESSENGER by Markus Zusak
JOHN LENNON: ALL I WANT IS THE TRUTH by Elizabeth Partridge
A WREATH FOR EMMETT TILL by Marilyn Nelson

The Newbery Medal
CRISS CROSS by Lynne Rae Perkins

Honor Books
WHITTINGTON by Alan Armstrong
HITLER YOUTH by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
PRINCESS ACADEMY by Shannon Hale
SHOW WAY by Jacqueline Woodson

The Caldecott Medal
THE HELLO GOODBYE WINDOW illus. by Chris Raschka, written by Norton Juster

Honor Books
ROSA, illus. by Bryan Collier, written by Nikki Giovanni
ZEN SHORTS written and illus. by Jon Muth
HOT AIR: THE (MOSTLY) TRUE STORY OF THE FIRST HOT-AIR BALLOON RIDE written and illus. by Marjorie Priceman
SONG OF THE WATERBOATMAN AND OTHER POND POEMS illus. by Beckie Prang, written by Joyce Sidman

36 Replies to “ALA awards announced!!”

  1. Thanks for announcing these! I almost completely forgot they announce these in January. I will have to add these to the lists my professor handed out last year in my Writing for Children’s class I took last spring.

  2. Thanks for announcing these! I almost completely forgot they announce these in January. I will have to add these to the lists my professor handed out last year in my Writing for Children’s class I took last spring.

  3. Thanks for announcing these! I almost completely forgot they announce these in January. I will have to add these to the lists my professor handed out last year in my Writing for Children’s class I took last spring.

      1. Can’t speak for thunderchikin, but I found it uplifting to see people that excited about books (clapping, whistling and woo-hooing as honors and winners were announced).

      2. ALA hosted a webcast on their site at ala.org. Unlike most webcasts, this one had a clear picture and sound. The video feed was in the upper left of the screen, about 1/6th of the screen. There was an agenda below that, also about 1/6th of the screen. The rest of the screen displayed a powerpoint listing the awards and then the winners’ names, along with a pic of the book cover. After each award, the names of the award committee were displayed.

        The speakers were straight forward in their delivery. No dilly-dallying here—librarians know the weight and value of words. After at initial welcome, the ALA rep (I missed her name), described the awards, named the Honor books, and then paused before saying the name of the Medal winners.

        The Printz was announced early on. The Caldecott and Newbery were saved until last (make of that what you will).

        After the announcements were finished, the first speaker returned to pass on thanks and to tell attendees to go out in the hallway to finish their conversations.

        It looked like fun.

        1. The superb ALA announcer, who had deliciously burgundy hair, was Ellen Fader. I wonder if she’s kin to Richard (anyone under 35 won’t get that, and it’s okay. I embrace my middle-age.)

  4. Can’t speak for thunderchikin, but I found it uplifting to see people that excited about books (clapping, whistling and woo-hooing as honors and winners were announced).

  5. Can’t speak for thunderchikin, but I found it uplifting to see people that excited about books (clapping, whistling and woo-hooing as honors and winners were announced).

  6. ALA hosted a webcast on their site at ala.org. Unlike most webcasts, this one had a clear picture and sound. The video feed was in the upper left of the screen, about 1/6th of the screen. There was an agenda below that, also about 1/6th of the screen. The rest of the screen displayed a powerpoint listing the awards and then the winners’ names, along with a pic of the book cover. After each award, the names of the award committee were displayed.

    The speakers were straight forward in their delivery. No dilly-dallying here—librarians know the weight and value of words. After at initial welcome, the ALA rep (I missed her name), described the awards, named the Honor books, and then paused before saying the name of the Medal winners.

    The Printz was announced early on. The Caldecott and Newbery were saved until last (make of that what you will).

    After the announcements were finished, the first speaker returned to pass on thanks and to tell attendees to go out in the hallway to finish their conversations.

    It looked like fun.

  7. ALA hosted a webcast on their site at ala.org. Unlike most webcasts, this one had a clear picture and sound. The video feed was in the upper left of the screen, about 1/6th of the screen. There was an agenda below that, also about 1/6th of the screen. The rest of the screen displayed a powerpoint listing the awards and then the winners’ names, along with a pic of the book cover. After each award, the names of the award committee were displayed.

    The speakers were straight forward in their delivery. No dilly-dallying here—librarians know the weight and value of words. After at initial welcome, the ALA rep (I missed her name), described the awards, named the Honor books, and then paused before saying the name of the Medal winners.

    The Printz was announced early on. The Caldecott and Newbery were saved until last (make of that what you will).

    After the announcements were finished, the first speaker returned to pass on thanks and to tell attendees to go out in the hallway to finish their conversations.

    It looked like fun.

  8. The superb ALA announcer, who had deliciously burgundy hair, was Ellen Fader. I wonder if she’s kin to Richard (anyone under 35 won’t get that, and it’s okay. I embrace my middle-age.)

  9. The superb ALA announcer, who had deliciously burgundy hair, was Ellen Fader. I wonder if she’s kin to Richard (anyone under 35 won’t get that, and it’s okay. I embrace my middle-age.)

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