Playing catch-up, chasing germs

Getting closer and closer to the end of this spring marathon. Today I spoke at West Broad Street Elementary in Souderton. It was a little weird visiting an elementary school after having been in so many high schools the last couple of months. I felt like a giant, Gulliver maybe.

And, as fate demands, a germ slipped through my careful defenses of vitamins, veggies, and tea. Something is trying to grow a colony of yukky stuff in my lungs. Ack. So let me post some photos and go to bed.

Image hosted by TinyPic.com For my third presentation at North yesterday we thought 15 students were coming and then all these guys showed up. It was fun. (I am still dreaming about the food in the English teacher’s lounge, BTW.)

Image hosted by TinyPic.com These second graders at West Broad showed me their haiku because I told them the first time I got excited about writing was when I learned to write haiku in second grade. They were SO EXCITED. It was like being around puppies. Second grade was the best. I wish I could go back. I used to love sharpening my pencil so I could smell it. Yes. I am a self-confessed pencil-smeller.

Now I am going to bed to think healthy thoughts – I will not get sick – I will not get sick – I will not get sick…

12 Replies to “Playing catch-up, chasing germs”

  1. Hi Laurie! I love the smell of freshly sharpened pencils too…

    I don’t know if this is the appropriate place to contact you, but I’ve so enjoyed reading your LJ entries and am such a huge admirer of your work that I can’t hold back any longer!

    I am a senior student majoring in English at Vassar College (“minoring” in dance) and am presently writing my thesis on gay identity in YA Lit. My thesis consists of a critical section in which I discuss the history of YA Lit and the work that’s been done regarding gay/lesbian/queer characters historically–and also a creative section in which I begin my own YA novel dealing with gay/lesbian/queer characters and all sorts of plot twists regarding identity and silence and questions and coming out and falling in love. I re-read your book Speak recently (for the fortieth time, okay more like my twelfth) as inspiration for my project… it is truly incredible, and painful, and beautiful, and IMPORTANT. My boyfriend (well, ex right now) was raped a few months ago by his best friend and so questions of sexual assault have been particularly close to my heart as of late, and I hope to someday write a YA novel which addresses issues of rape in gay male relationships.

    Anyway, all of this is to just let you know that I admire you greatly and I a so deeply grateful for Speak. Oh! Also, I wondered if you had any pointers on how to get my work published? I’ll be trying to finish the novel this summer as I work in a bakery on the island of Nantucket, MA. In the fall I will be working as a Harris Fellow in the Calvin Hill Day Care Center in New Haven, CT, and will hopefully be writing the whole time as well. *shrug* I have no idea where to start the process of publishing my work and thought if you had the time you might at least offer a few short points of advice?

    If you’re busy that’s okay! Best of luck in the future! Your LJ and photos are amazing…

    Much peace, take care,
    Patrick (LJ username: fal126)

  2. Hi Laurie! I love the smell of freshly sharpened pencils too…

    I don’t know if this is the appropriate place to contact you, but I’ve so enjoyed reading your LJ entries and am such a huge admirer of your work that I can’t hold back any longer!

    I am a senior student majoring in English at Vassar College (“minoring” in dance) and am presently writing my thesis on gay identity in YA Lit. My thesis consists of a critical section in which I discuss the history of YA Lit and the work that’s been done regarding gay/lesbian/queer characters historically–and also a creative section in which I begin my own YA novel dealing with gay/lesbian/queer characters and all sorts of plot twists regarding identity and silence and questions and coming out and falling in love. I re-read your book Speak recently (for the fortieth time, okay more like my twelfth) as inspiration for my project… it is truly incredible, and painful, and beautiful, and IMPORTANT. My boyfriend (well, ex right now) was raped a few months ago by his best friend and so questions of sexual assault have been particularly close to my heart as of late, and I hope to someday write a YA novel which addresses issues of rape in gay male relationships.

    Anyway, all of this is to just let you know that I admire you greatly and I a so deeply grateful for Speak. Oh! Also, I wondered if you had any pointers on how to get my work published? I’ll be trying to finish the novel this summer as I work in a bakery on the island of Nantucket, MA. In the fall I will be working as a Harris Fellow in the Calvin Hill Day Care Center in New Haven, CT, and will hopefully be writing the whole time as well. *shrug* I have no idea where to start the process of publishing my work and thought if you had the time you might at least offer a few short points of advice?

    If you’re busy that’s okay! Best of luck in the future! Your LJ and photos are amazing…

    Much peace, take care,
    Patrick (LJ username: fal126)

    1. Hi, Patrick. Your thesis sounds fascinating!

      I really don’t have much advice to add to what the experts say about getting published, but here’s my tip list:

      1. Write from the heart. Don’t worry about what will or will not sell.
      2. In you are writing for kids or teens, join SCBWI. Be sure to attend conferences.
      3. Keep your day job.
      4. Check this out.
      5. Never give up. Never, never, never, never.

      Good luck!

      1. Many, many thanks! I’m glad to hear that you’re feeling better…

        Best wishes for the spring and early summer!
        -Patrick Kearns 🙂

  3. Hi Laurie! I love the smell of freshly sharpened pencils too…

    I don’t know if this is the appropriate place to contact you, but I’ve so enjoyed reading your LJ entries and am such a huge admirer of your work that I can’t hold back any longer!

    I am a senior student majoring in English at Vassar College (“minoring” in dance) and am presently writing my thesis on gay identity in YA Lit. My thesis consists of a critical section in which I discuss the history of YA Lit and the work that’s been done regarding gay/lesbian/queer characters historically–and also a creative section in which I begin my own YA novel dealing with gay/lesbian/queer characters and all sorts of plot twists regarding identity and silence and questions and coming out and falling in love. I re-read your book Speak recently (for the fortieth time, okay more like my twelfth) as inspiration for my project… it is truly incredible, and painful, and beautiful, and IMPORTANT. My boyfriend (well, ex right now) was raped a few months ago by his best friend and so questions of sexual assault have been particularly close to my heart as of late, and I hope to someday write a YA novel which addresses issues of rape in gay male relationships.

    Anyway, all of this is to just let you know that I admire you greatly and I a so deeply grateful for Speak. Oh! Also, I wondered if you had any pointers on how to get my work published? I’ll be trying to finish the novel this summer as I work in a bakery on the island of Nantucket, MA. In the fall I will be working as a Harris Fellow in the Calvin Hill Day Care Center in New Haven, CT, and will hopefully be writing the whole time as well. *shrug* I have no idea where to start the process of publishing my work and thought if you had the time you might at least offer a few short points of advice?

    If you’re busy that’s okay! Best of luck in the future! Your LJ and photos are amazing…

    Much peace, take care,
    Patrick (LJ username: fal126)

  4. Hi, Patrick. Your thesis sounds fascinating!

    I really don’t have much advice to add to what the experts say about getting published, but here’s my tip list:

    1. Write from the heart. Don’t worry about what will or will not sell.
    2. In you are writing for kids or teens, join SCBWI. Be sure to attend conferences.
    3. Keep your day job.
    4. Check this out.
    5. Never give up. Never, never, never, never.

    Good luck!

  5. Hi, Patrick. Your thesis sounds fascinating!

    I really don’t have much advice to add to what the experts say about getting published, but here’s my tip list:

    1. Write from the heart. Don’t worry about what will or will not sell.
    2. In you are writing for kids or teens, join SCBWI. Be sure to attend conferences.
    3. Keep your day job.
    4. Check this out.
    5. Never give up. Never, never, never, never.

    Good luck!

  6. Many, many thanks! I’m glad to hear that you’re feeling better…

    Best wishes for the spring and early summer!
    -Patrick Kearns 🙂

  7. Many, many thanks! I’m glad to hear that you’re feeling better…

    Best wishes for the spring and early summer!
    -Patrick Kearns 🙂

Comments are closed.